Welcome to UNT Texas Center for Performing Arts Health

The Texas Center for Performing Arts Health, formerly known as the Texas Center for Music & Medicine, is an interdisciplinary partnership led by the UNT College of Music and the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine together with School of Public Health, the College of Engineering, and the College of Public Affairs and Community Service

Faculty across the UNT Denton and UNT Health Science Center in Fort Worth campuses work together to study, treat, and prevent various occupational health problems associated with learning and performing music and other performing arts. Through these committed collaborations, students can enroll in specialized courses, select an optional related field of study in music medicine, participate in ongoing research and outreach initiatives, and pursue their own research projects.

The TCPAH provides specialized clinical resources to both students and non-students. Clinical services for voice, musculoskeletal, auditory, and mental health concerns are available through the Music Medicine Student Clinic, the Performing Arts Medicine Clinic at the UNT Health Science Center in Fort Worth, the UNT Counseling and Testing Center, and the UNT Speech and Hearing Center.

 


 

Recent News

Dr. Eric M. Nestler, Professor of Instrumental Studies and renowned saxophonist, has just published a new article in The Saxophone Symposium: Journal of the North American Saxophone Alliance. “The Nightmare of Musician’s Dystonia: A New Dawn of Hope for Treatment,” is a scholarly recounting of Dr. Nestler’s very personal journey of living with dystonia, the treatments available, and the stories of others on the same path. As he defines it in the paper, dystonia is a disorder affecting the nervous system, in which the brain sends the wrong signals to muscles, causing them to contract involuntarily.

After a rapid decline in his ability to play his saxophone, Dr. Nestler was diagnosed with dystonia in 2009 and has spent the past eight years seeking treatment in order to return to the performing career he once enjoyed. Luckily, some of that treatment was found in his own backyard with the Texas Center for Performing Arts Health co-director, Dr. Sajid Surve. Dr. Nestler highlights how his work with Dr. Surve at the Performing Arts Medicine Clinic of the University of North Texas Health Science Center helped him regain the necessary muscle control for proper saxophone embouchure. He was even able to return to performing in 2014, and continues to discover new ways to practice in order to help him overcome the difficulties of dystonia. The Texas Center for Performing Arts Health congratulates Dr. Nestler on the new publication and on his continuing recovery.


David Bracken, MD
Senior Resident: University fo California
San Diego, Dept. of Otolaryngology / Head and Neck Surgery

8:00AM — Intersection of Medicine and the Performing Arts

A discussion of the history, unique medical conditions encountered by musicians, and possible roles for musical artists can play in the field.
Room 287

9:30 AM — Laryngeal Form and Function: Vocalist to ENT

A discussion of journey from Vocal Performance to Medicine; an ENT perspective in the approach of care and treatment of the voice; and insights of laryngeal anatomy in vocal technique.
Room 289


Dr. Stephen F. Austin, Professor of Voice and collaborator with the Texas Center for Performing Arts Health, has recently released Provenance: Historic Voice Pedagogy Viewed through a Contemporary Lens. This book is an anthology of articles originally written for the Journal of Singing over the course of eleven years. Provenance connects historic vocal pedagogical writings with the wisdom of today, often using facsimile and translation of original sources to remind singers and voice teachers alike of the wealth of knowledge already in existence. Dr. Austin’s background in voice science leads to enlightening commentary, expanding our understanding of the ‘Old Masters’ such as Manuel Garcia, Lamperti, Bassini, Stockhausen and others. Dr. Scott McCoy of Ohio State University praises the new volume, saying, “Each new generation of singing teachers seems to think it must ‘reinvent the wheel’: Austin clearly proves that there is an alternate, more effective path to vocal excellence.” Provenance is published by Inside View Press, and may be purchased at www.insideviewpress.com . Stay tuned for information regarding a second volume of work designed as a companion book, in which Dr. Austin uses his clear, distinct approach to teaching voice in a step-by-step historically based vocal method.